Marking Group Work

Peer evaluation is an effective way to mark group work, but there need to be clear guidelines in place. Here are some examples which I found in a document from the University of Maryland regarding best practices in group work and collaborative learning.

  1. The group is assigned a grade by their instructor. Group members grade each other out of 100. Each group member receives the assigned grade by their instructor multiplied by the average of the percentages assigned by their other group members.
  2. Group members assigned each other a grade out of 5 in increments of 0.5. Group members that receive an average above 4 will receive 100%. Averages between 3.5 and 4, 3 and 3.5, and so will receive lower percentages determined by the instructor.
  3. A group of x students are given (x-1)*10 points each to distribute among their group members. Minimum, average, and maximum numbers of given points are set. The overall score for each group member is determined by adding up the points given to them.
  4. A group of students are given 100 points each to distribute among their group members. Each group member receives an assigned grade by their instructor multiplied by the number of points given to them

Examples:

  1. An instructor assigned the group a grade of 90%. Student A gives student B 80 points and C 70 points. Student B gives student A 90 points and C 75 points. Student C gives A 95 points and B 80 points. The instructor then gives student A 83.25%, student B 72% and student C 67.5%.
  2. Student A gives student B 4/5 and C 3.5/5. Student B gives student A 4.5/5 and C 4/5. Student C gives A 5/5 and B 4/5. Student A has an average of 4.75/5, B has 4/5, and C has 3.75/5. Based on predetermined percentages by the instructor student A receives 100%, B receives 85%, and C receives 80%.
  3. A group has three students, so each student is given 20 points to distribute among their group members. Each student may give between 4 and 16 points to each other student and the average between the two students must be 10. Student A gives student B 11 points and C 9 points. Student B gives student A 12 points and C 8 points. Student C gives A 10 points and B 10 points. The overall score for student A is 22, B is 21, and C is 17. Taking 22 as the highest score, student A receives 100%, B receives 95%, and C receives 77%.
  4. An instructor assigned the group a grade of 90%. Student A gives student B 55 points and C 45 points. Student B givens student A 60 points and C 40 points. Student C gives A 50 points and B 50 points. The instructor then gives student A 99%, B 94.5%, and C 76.5%

Reference

http://www.gened.umd.edu/documents/GroupWork.pdf

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About simoncrothers

I am an Australian who moved to British Columbia, Canada with my family in 1998. After completing my undergraduate degree in mathematics and computing science at Simon Fraser University, I moved back to Australia for several years. During this time I completed a Masters in Computational Mathematics and began my teaching career in mathematics at the University of New South Wales. In 2010, I moved back to Canada and taught computer science at Douglas College for three years. I am currently regular faculty in the Computer Business Systems department at KPU. I have also taught some courses in the Business and Quantitative Methods department at KPU. In my spare time I like to spend time with my wife Jami, who I met in Australia, our three year old daughter Lillian, and our newly born son Aiden. I also like to indulge in the occasional video game and I am involved in various self-employed web development projects.
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