Classroom Management: Jim Scrivener’s Secrets

In the following video, Jim Scrivener reveals his secret teaching tip for classroom management. It is so simple and I’d encourage you to watch this short video before reading on.

So what was the secret teaching tip? Jim mentioned that instructors should not give students immediate yes/no feedback when responding to a question. Instead, they should simply wait for five seconds. This gives other students in the class the chance to voice their approval or disapproval of the given answer and share their insight into what the answer may be. I find this to be a brilliant technique as it encourages discussion in the classroom. A one-on-one conversation between an instructor and student and open up to a group discussion simply by the instructor holding back on their response. In my teaching I always wait a bit after asking my class a question, however it has not occurred to me to wait a bit after the student has given their answer. This is definitely a technique I will apply to my teaching straight away. Thanks Jim!

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About simoncrothers

I am an Australian who moved to British Columbia, Canada with my family in 1998. After completing my undergraduate degree in mathematics and computing science at Simon Fraser University, I moved back to Australia for several years. During this time I completed a Masters in Computational Mathematics and began my teaching career in mathematics at the University of New South Wales. In 2010, I moved back to Canada and taught computer science at Douglas College for three years. I am currently regular faculty in the Computer Business Systems department at KPU. I have also taught some courses in the Business and Quantitative Methods department at KPU. In my spare time I like to spend time with my wife Jami, who I met in Australia, our three year old daughter Lillian, and our newly born son Aiden. I also like to indulge in the occasional video game and I am involved in various self-employed web development projects.
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